A Ku Indeed!

Still Waiting, and Weird Baby Names

Posted in Life by Chris on August 17, 2008

We’re still…waiting. No baby. We thought for sure we’d have a new arrival by now, but baby arrival medical science is like Aristotelean virtue ethics — you can’t demand more precision than the subject matter allows. While we’re waiting, we’re having issues with baby names. We have a firm name for a girl, if it is a girl (we don’t know the sex of the baby). We’re hung up on the name for the kid if it is a boy. We’ve solicited help from others in coming up with cool boy names, by the way, so if you have one (or some) please feel free to leave a suggestion!

However, for some people, “cool name for a baby” goes a bit too far… (click below)

“Cool” is one thing. “Freak” is another. You would hope that this is not serious, but I think it is. I mean come on — “Grim Batol”? Really? Oh…kay. (h/t Adam for the link)

Advertisements

23 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. Swad said, on August 17, 2008 at 8:15 am

    I’m a big fan of “Doomhammer,” listed above. Kid would NEVER get picked on in the playground.

  2. Jay Mullen said, on August 17, 2008 at 2:16 pm

    Miles.

  3. Bill Haines said, on August 17, 2008 at 7:38 pm

    Niedelsohn

  4. Million said, on August 18, 2008 at 3:37 am

    I’m not sure what to think. Part of me is scared that someone would use Warcraft to name their kid. The other part of me feels like a dork because I knew every name on the list.

  5. Chris said, on August 18, 2008 at 1:38 pm

    Swad,

    That would depend on how big the kid was. If the kid is big and burly, yeah, “Orgrim Doomhammer” would only add to the intimidation factor. But now think of it the other way — what if the kid is small and nerdy, has a pocket protector and big old coke bottle thick glasses? Then I could imagine that he’d be a magnet for continual ass kickings. Imagine it: kids saying every day “Yeah, I opened up a can of whoop ass on ol’ Doomhammer again!”

    Jay,

    We’ve considered that name, actually. We thought maybe “Milo” but I think the combo “Miles/Milo” Panza just didn’t seem to sound right. We like the name, but together it seems to not fit.

    Bill,

    I’ve never heard of that name before. Is it German? Mixing ethnicities!

    Million,

    After years of AOE, I thought maybe “Trebuchet” for a touch of the French, or maybe “Shang Hittite” but nothing fits.

    I’ve tried to push “McLovin” (with no last name, of course), but Christie said no. 🙂

  6. Bill Haines said, on August 18, 2008 at 3:16 pm

    Chris, I made it up. It’s not the whole name.
    It’s how it beginza.

  7. Chris said, on August 18, 2008 at 5:44 pm

    Bill,

    I had a feeling you made it up, but I was playing it safe. I didn’t want to say “Hey, did you just make that up?” and then find out that it was the name of your beloved grandfather or something. 🙂

    Bad in HK?

  8. Bill Haines said, on August 18, 2008 at 6:10 pm

    Bad? Yes, Master of Bad:

  9. Chris said, on August 18, 2008 at 6:33 pm

    My blog spelling is god awful. I meant “back” obviously.

    In any case, I see your You Tube music video, and raise you one.

  10. Bill Haines said, on August 18, 2008 at 7:03 pm

    I’ll see yours

    and raise you one:

  11. Bill Haines said, on August 18, 2008 at 7:04 pm

    One day you can tell your son:

    This is how it beganza,
    Niedelsohn Panza.

  12. Jay Mullen said, on August 18, 2008 at 8:27 pm

    I’m not sold that Miles Panza doesn’t sound good. In any event, I’m seriously trying to help here. Let’s throw out some more non gospel writer boy names:

    Pierce, Clayton, Owen, Kellen, Griffin, Colton, Cole, Colt, Gannon, Jesse, Shane, Liam, Cavin, Gavin, Brayden, Ty, Max, Conor, Dean, Evan, Nial, Seamus, Wells, Sage…

    I tried.

  13. Chris said, on August 18, 2008 at 8:31 pm

    Jay,

    I’ll present these to the wife. Thanks for throwing some out — seriously! Boy names are hard as hell. Girls names come easy, for some strange reason. I know she really likes Max, and my mom is very partial to Evan.

    Bill,

    “Well, McLovin, take a seat. Here’s the skinny…”

  14. Chris said, on August 18, 2008 at 8:32 pm

    Jay,

    Oh, I should add that Parker is very partial to “Max” too. But I think this is due to “Max and Ruby” (one of her favorite cartoons).

    C

  15. Chris said, on August 18, 2008 at 8:37 pm

    Bill,

    Solid Potato is a good one. You’ll have to give me a minute to think about how to raise on that one.

  16. Bill Haines said, on August 19, 2008 at 1:41 pm

    But seriously folks … I suspect kids like the idea of being named after an ancestor, so long as they don’t know or dislike the ancestor in question. That way the name stands (obscurely) for the strength of the family bond, i.e. “Kid, you’re important to us.”

  17. Bill Haines said, on August 19, 2008 at 2:39 pm

    I should have said “… so long as they don’t know AND dislike …”.

  18. Alexus McLeod said, on August 19, 2008 at 3:55 pm

    Yeah–to be named after an ancestor definitely, but not (in any circumstance!) after a parent. I was cursed with that–my first name is Gustavus, same as my father’s, which is why I use my middle name (which is, thank God, different than his). It’s just bad in about every conceivable way. Not that I dislike my dad, but it’s a hellish inconvenience to have the same name, especially when you live in the same household for around 18 years (or in my case, 24 years). We gave our son a partially ancestral name–his middle name, Thomas, is after my mother’s uncle. Of course, Siddhu really likes “Thomas the Tank Engine” too, so maybe we’ll tell him he’s named after the train 🙂

  19. Bill Haines said, on August 19, 2008 at 4:10 pm

    My first name is my father’s middle name, so one can do it that way.

  20. Alexus McLeod said, on August 19, 2008 at 4:17 pm

    Yeah–if it has to be done, that seems like a much better way.

  21. Chris said, on August 19, 2008 at 4:18 pm

    I agree with Bill that ancestry is important in naming. My middle name is my grandfather’s first name, and Parker’s middle name is my mom’s middle name. I think it accomplishes a dual function — it tells the child, as Bill says, that they are important enough to incorporate (through naming) into the family historical “narrative.” It also does the same for the named-after, if that person is still alive — it tells the person that they will continue to play a part in the evolving narrative through the life of the new child. So it tells the person that they, too, are that important.

    I also agree with Alexus that to give a child a first name that is same as a parent’s first name is a bit much. I may be wrong, but my guess is that it cedes too much authority to the named-after, and squashes the individuality of the named.

    The only problem left, as Bill notes, is to find someone in that historical family narrative that you — and the child — actually like. 🙂

  22. Bill Haines said, on August 19, 2008 at 4:24 pm

    I think non-disliking is enough!

  23. Chris said, on August 19, 2008 at 4:26 pm

    Heh…I think in some families there’s a need to lower the bar a bit to increase the size of the candidate pool!


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: